Rahm finished tied for 27th place in his first Masters and then finished 4th in the Wells Fargo Championship and joint runner-up in the Dean & DeLuca Invitational, results which lifted him into the top-10 of the World Rankings.[17][18][19] Making his debut in a European Tour event, he finished tied for 10th in the Open de France and, the following week, he earned his first European Tour victory by winning the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open by six strokes.[20]
After the U.S. Open, Rahm turned professional, which meant that he forfeited his exemption into the 2016 Open Championship. The next week Rahm played in his first event as a pro at the Quicken Loans National. He held or shared the lead for the first two rounds and finished tied for third place, four strokes behind the winner, Billy Hurley III.[11] The finish was enough for Rahm to regain entry into The Open, as the Quicken Loans National was part of the Open Qualifying Series. Rahm finished tied runner-up in the RBC Canadian Open, securing Special Temporary Member status for the remainder of the season.[12] He gained enough points as a non-member to earn a PGA Tour card for 2017.
Only three weeks later, on July 9, 2017, Schauffele recorded his first PGA Tour victory at the Greenbrier Classic. He started the final round three shots behind leader Sebastián Muñoz, who had led since the first round. Schauffele shot a 3-under-par 67, which included two birdies in his final three holes, to win by one stroke over Robert Streb. With the win, he earned exemptions into the Open Championship, via the Open Qualifying Series, the PGA Championship and the 2018 Masters Tournament.
BMW Masters: Finished second to Kristoffer Broberg in a sudden-death playoff at the BMW Masters in Shanghai. Opened with rounds of 71-69-64 and took a one-shot lead on the back nine on Sunday with an eagle out of a bunker on No. 15 followed by a birdie on No. 16. After a bogey on No. 17, finished with a par for a final-round 71 and a 271 total to match Broberg. In the playoff, the Swede drained a 15-foot birdie putt on the first extra hole to claim his first European Tour title.

After a solid first season on the Web.com Tour, Xander finished in 26th position at the end of regular season play, a mere US$ 900.00 short of earning a PGA Tour card. In the ensuing Web.com Playoffs Xander did finish in 15th position securing his privileges for PGA Tour membership the hard way.  Xander finished his first PGA Tour season with a solid run beginning with a T5 at the 2017 US Open and ending with being the first ever rookie to win the PGA Tour Championship.  His 2-win season (2017 Greenbrier Classic; 2017 Tour Championship) earned Xander the Rookie of the Year award for the 2016-2017 season.
On January 12, Reed won his fourth PGA Tour title at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions by defeating Jimmy Walker in a sudden death playoff.[27] He became just the fourth player in the last two decades to win four times on the PGA Tour before his 25th birthday, the other three were Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy, and Sergio García.[28] The win moved Reed to a career-best OWGR ranking of 14th.[29] Also, he finished second at the Valspar Championship, third at the Hero World Challenge, and seventh at the Honda Classic.[30][31][32] Reed also joined the European Tour for the 2015 season.
Humana Challenge in partnership with the Clinton Foundation: Took a seven-stroke lead into the Humana Challenge final round and held on for a two-stroke, wire-to-wire win. Shots rounds 63-63-63-71. Recorded his second career TOUR win at age 23 years, 5 months, 14 days in his 46th career TOUR start. It was his second win in his last nine TOUR starts (2013 Wyndham Championship). Became just the second wire-to-wire winner of the event (Rik Massengale in 1977). Led the field with 30 birdies. Was just the sixth wire-to-wire winner on TOUR since 2010 and became the first player in PGA TOUR history to post scores of 63 or better in his first three rounds. Is the second-youngest winner of the Humana Challenge, behind Jack Nicklaus (23 years, 13 days in 1963). Became the 12th player to carry a final-round lead of the Humana Challenge on to victory since 1990. Has converted both of his third-round leads/co-leads into victory. His 54-hole total score of 189 broke the low 54-hole score at the Humana Challenge (191 by Pat Perez in 2009). His 54-hole total of 189 came within one shot of the lowest 54-hole score in TOUR history (Steve Stricker at the 2010 John Deere Classic). Broke the TOUR 54-hole scoring record in relation to par by two shots, with a 27-under. First victory came with wife as caddie and second was with brother-in-law Kessler Karain.
SBS Tournament of Champions: Became the season's first multiple winner with a three-stroke win over Hideki Matsuyama at the SBS Tournament of Champions. Opened with three consecutive 67s to carry a two-stroke lead into the final round, closing with a 69 to secure this third PGA TOUR victory in his 73rd start at the age of 23 years, 8 months and 10 days. With the win, moved within 36 points of Matsuyama's FedExCup lead and in the process, became the seventh consecutive American-born winner in Kapalua. Popular victory among his peers, with Jimmy Walker and Jordan Spieth hanging around to watch him claim the victory on the final hole.
World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship: Making his first start in a World Golf Championships event, reached 14-under and held the solo-lead in the final round of the World Golf Championships-Mexico Championship for a short time after beginning the back nine par-eagle-par-par-birdie-birdie. Missed putts of seven and eight feet on Nos. 16 and 17 for bogeys, which resulted in a 12-under 272 tournament total (T3), two shots behind Dustin Johnson.
Justin Thomas, in full,Justin Louis Thomas, (born April 29, 1993, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.), American golfer who, in 2017, won his first "major" at the 99th PGA Championship at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, North Carolina, becoming just the fourth golfer before his 25th birthday to win a major and register five victories in one season. (The other golfers were Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, and Jordan Spieth). At the season ending Tour Championship, he finished second, earning him enough points to win the coveted FedEx Cup and its $10 million bonus. He was named PGA Player of the Year for 2017.
On July 16, 2019, at the 2019 Open Championship, the R&A found Schauffele's driver failed to meet CT test requirements. Schauffele was forced to scramble for a replacement driver. The R&A made 30 random inspections of players' clubs and Schauffele's driver was found to be one of four drivers of the 30 strong sample not to comply with the CT test requirements. The manufacturers brands that had drivers fail the CT test are: Callaway, Ping, Taylormade. It also has become public knowledge, that during a testing in May 2019 at the Diamond Cup Golf event on the Japan Golf Tour, some 15 drivers in the field had failed the very same CT test requirements. Rumors, that Schauffele's driver was the only one and additionally the first one ever to fail the R&A's CT test were proven unfounded and false.[31][32][33]
Thomas had another chance to claim the top spot in the world later on in March at the WGC-Match Play, but he was beaten 3 & 2 by Bubba Watson in the semi-finals. He then went on to lose the consolation match 5 & 3 to Alexander Norén to finish in fourth place. The result extended his lead at the top of the FedEx Cup standings and reduced the gap on the world number one, Dustin Johnson.
Advanced to the FedExCup Playoffs for the second consecutive time in his career, making it to the TOUR Championship for the first time. Entered the Playoffs finale in the No. 12 position in the FedExCup standings and finished T6 at East Lake to end his season No. 12 in the FedExCup standings. Recorded 10 top-25 finishes from 28 starts. Of those, five were top-five showings, including his maiden PGA TOUR victory at the CIMB Classic.
DP World Tour Championship, Dubai: Notched his sixth European Tour victory at the DP World Tour Championship, Dubai, and clinched the 2019 Race to Dubai Rankings Presented by Rolex. A closing 68 included a birdie on the 72nd hole to edge out Tommy Fleetwood by a stroke at 19-under 269. Became the first player to earn four Rolex Series titles and just the second Spaniard to win the Harry Vardon Trophy.
CIMB Classic: In defense of his CIMB Classic title in Malaysia, opened and closed with 8-under 64s to claim a three-stroke victory over Hideki Matsuyama at 23-under 265. Began the final round at TPC Kuala Lumpur trailing 54-hole leader Anirban Lahiri by four strokes. When Lahiri took a quadruple bogey-9 at No. 3, Thomas took the lead with six birdies in his first 10 holes. With the win, joined Ryan Moore (2013-14) as players to successfully defend a CIMB Classic title. Became the first player to have his first two PGA TOUR victories come at the same event since Matt Every at the 2014 and 2015 Arnold Palmer Invitational. Made 29 birdies for the week, bringing his total through the first two events of the season to 52 birdies and one eagle, a value of $13,250 to the Hurricane Matthew relief efforts.
After turning professional in June 2015, Schauffele entered the 2015 Web.com Tour Qualifying Tournament in fall. He was runner up in first stage at Southern Dunes GC in Maricopa, Arizona. He went on to win second stage at Oak Valley GC in Beaumont, California and ultimately earned his Web.com Tour card in the finals in Florida in a tie for 40th.[9]
Reed told Crouse "For somebody as successful in the Ryder Cup as I am, I don't think it's smart to sit me twice." Reed implied that Tiger Woods was his "second choice". He told Crouse that after he and Woods lost their first match against Tommy Fleetwood and Francesco Molinari, Woods apologized to Reed for letting him down. Reed said he told Woods, "We win together as a team and we lose together as a team." Reed told Crouse that "very day [in the team room], I saw 'Leave your egos at the door,'". Referring to the Europeans, he added, "They do that better than us." There has been concern expressed that Reed's public flaming of his teammates and captain will negatively impact on his ability to play on future Ryder Cup and President Cup teams.[40]
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