Buick Invitational: Won his first start of the season for the fourth time in 11 seasons on TOUR. Became the first player in Buick Invitational history to win the tournament four times (1999, 2003, 2005-06). Made an eight-foot birdie on 72nd hole to get into a three-man playoff with Jose Maria Olazabal and Nathan Green. Green was eliminated after first hole, Olazabal on the second.

I was a bit skeptical about spending $10 or so a month on two blokes telling me how to swing a golf club on the net, how wrong was I. I just wanted to... say a massive thank you to you both, my game has improved so much in the 4 months that I've been a member and now all I want to do is play or hit balls at the range. Also, Andy did a little segment on chipping from the rough and coming down onto the ball.....well anyway I had a shot like that and I thought to myself what did the boys tell me to do. I was literally 5cm away from the water in sand with little back swing, so I've come down on to the ball and I got out (it didn't go far, but I got out) with out dropping a shot, so again thank you so so much for your great videos, loving every one of them. Cheers! Read More
THE TOUR Championship presented by Coca-Cola: Entered the TOUR Championship No. 1 in the FedExCup standings and romped for his seventh victory of the season by eight over Mark Calcavecchia and Zach Johnson with rounds of 64-63-64-66–257 and captured the first FedExCup. Season earnings were a career-best $10,867,052. First player to win the TOUR Championship multiple times.
Find the keys to improving each aspect of your golf game—from long shots to dancing around the green and everything in between—with help from Piers Ward and Andy Proudman. Each episode locks in on specific skills, drills and practices that you can apply to your golf game, all designed to help you build a solid foundation for consistent results whenever and wherever you play.
THE TOUR Championship presented by Coca-Cola: Entered the TOUR Championship No. 1 in the FedExCup standings and romped for his seventh victory of the season by eight over Mark Calcavecchia and Zach Johnson with rounds of 64-63-64-66–257 and captured the first FedExCup. Season earnings were a career-best $10,867,052. First player to win the TOUR Championship multiple times.
Me and My Golf is the No. 1 subscribed golf YouTube channel in the world. Piers and Andy provide a variety of video content for avid golf fans that reaches more than 180 countries. Essentially, Me and My Golf's social channels feature core instructional training tips and drills, as well as entertainment focused golf challenges, course Vlogs and trick shots. Piers has spent more than 15 years helping golfers, delivering 35,000+ lessons. After years of learning from the best coaches around the world, he has developed a simple approach to help golfers improve. His greatest skill is understanding the needs of his students, which allows him to deliver “their best lesson." Andy has spent the last 11 years coaching golf and has a passion for helping people improve. His dedication to improving his knowledge has taken him around the world, and he has learned his craft from some of the best coaches and players. Andy’s promise is to share his experiences to deliver first-class instruction
My son often dials up their videos and invites me to sit and watch with him. Pretty fun to watch. We live in California and my son has said, "I want to play with these guys. Maybe they'll play Montreux with us." Heck, we'd like to have them at our CC here in the Sacto area. They'd probably like the course. Will have to reach out... I dig their hats and will be getting a couple of them. 

Surgery: Announced on Wednesday, June 18, two days after winning the U.S. Open, that he would have reconstructive surgery on the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee and miss the remainder of the 2008 season. Also announced that pain in his leg during the U.S. Open resulted from a double stress fracture to his left tibia, which he suffered while rehabilitating the knee. Surgery was performed on Tuesday, June 24 in Park City, Utah, by Dr. Thomas D. Rosenberg and Dr. Vernon J. Cooley, who did arthroscopic surgery on the same knee in April.
Woods was heavily recruited by college golf powers. He chose Stanford University, the 1994 NCAA champions. He enrolled at Stanford in the fall of 1994 under a golf scholarship and won his first collegiate event, the 40th Annual William H. Tucker Invitational, that September.[50] He selected a major in economics and was nicknamed "Urkel" by college teammate Notah Begay III.[51] In 1995, he successfully defended his U.S. Amateur title at the Newport Country Club in Rhode Island[44] and was voted Pac-10 Player of the Year, NCAA First Team All-American, and Stanford's Male Freshman of the Year (an award that encompasses all sports).[52][53]
The Open Championship: Earned 10th professional major title at The Open Championship at age 29 years, 6 months and 17 days in his 35th major as a professional. Posted rounds of 66-67-71-70–274 at St. Andrews to defeat nearest challenger Colin Montgomerie by five strokes. The youngest and quickest to win each of the four major championships twice. Jack Nicklaus was the first to accomplish the feat at 31 years, 1 month and 7 days when he won his second PGA in 1971 in his 37th major as a professional. Sixth player in The Open Championship history to win in wire-to-wire fashion–Ted Ray (1912), Bobby Jones (1927), Gene Sarazen (1932), Henry Cotton (1934) and Tom Weiskopf (1973).

BMW Championship: Matched the low final round of his career with an 8-under 63 to win the BMW Championship by two strokes for 60th career TOUR victory. Took the lead for good with a 12-foot birdie on the 13th hole and kept his distance from third-round co-leaders Aaron Baddeley and Steve Stricker. Finished at 22-under 262, breaking by five shots the record he set four years prior at Cog Hill.
Woods was 15 years old and a student at Western High School in Anaheim when he became the youngest U.S. Junior Amateur champion; this was a record that stood until it was broken by Jim Liu in 2010.[40] He was named 1991's Southern California Amateur Player of the Year (for the second consecutive year) and Golf Digest Junior Amateur Player of the Year. In 1992, he defended his title at the U.S. Junior Amateur Championship, becoming the tournament's first two-time winner. He also competed in his first PGA Tour event, the Nissan Los Angeles Open (he missed the 36-hole cut), and was named Golf Digest Amateur Player of the Year, Golf World Player of the Year, and Golfweek National Amateur of the Year.[41][42]
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