The Open Championship: Earned 10th professional major title at The Open Championship at age 29 years, 6 months and 17 days in his 35th major as a professional. Posted rounds of 66-67-71-70–274 at St. Andrews to defeat nearest challenger Colin Montgomerie by five strokes. The youngest and quickest to win each of the four major championships twice. Jack Nicklaus was the first to accomplish the feat at 31 years, 1 month and 7 days when he won his second PGA in 1971 in his 37th major as a professional. Sixth player in The Open Championship history to win in wire-to-wire fashion–Ted Ray (1912), Bobby Jones (1927), Gene Sarazen (1932), Henry Cotton (1934) and Tom Weiskopf (1973).
Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard: Sank a 24-foot birdie putt on the final hole to beat Bart Bryant and win the Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard by one stroke, extending his PGA TOUR winning streak to five tournament starts. The win was the 64th of his career, tying Ben Hogan at No. 3 on the PGA TOUR career victory list.
My son often dials up their videos and invites me to sit and watch with him. Pretty fun to watch. We live in California and my son has said, "I want to play with these guys. Maybe they'll play Montreux with us." Heck, we'd like to have them at our CC here in the Sacto area. They'd probably like the course. Will have to reach out... I dig their hats and will be getting a couple of them.

I love your site. Your instruction is just fantastic. The combination of video with explanation and correction drills is superb. I am a single digit h... andicapper who basically knows my swing and its faults. Your videos have really helped my ball striking and short game. You guys are such good teachers. You teach directly and plainly without all the nonsense, plus you both have beautiful swings which helps a visual learner like me to emulate. I am so glad that I joined. Your site is very well organized and easy to navigate. I love the fact that I can create my own categories and save videos to refer back to later. I am so glad that I found this. Thanks a bunch! Read More


Fluff Cowan served as Woods' caddie from the start of his professional career until Woods dismissed him in March 1999.[179] He was replaced by Steve Williams, who became a close friend of Woods and is often credited with helping him with key shots and putts.[180] In June 2011, Woods dismissed Williams after he caddied for Adam Scott in the U.S. Open[181] and replaced him with friend Bryon Bell on an interim basis. Joe LaCava, a former caddie of both Fred Couples and Dustin Johnson, was hired by Woods shortly after[182] and has remained Woods' caddie since then.
In 1978, Tiger putted against comedian Bob Hope in a television appearance on The Mike Douglas Show. At age three, he shot a 48 over nine holes at the Navy course. At age five, he appeared in Golf Digest and on ABC's That's Incredible![27] Before turning seven, Tiger won the Under Age 10 section of the Drive, Pitch, and Putt competition, held at the Navy Golf Course in Cypress, California.[28] In 1984 at the age of eight, he won the 9–10 boys' event, the youngest age group available, at the Junior World Golf Championships.[29] He first broke 80 at age eight.[30] He went on to win the Junior World Championships six times, including four consecutive wins from 1988 to 1991.[31][32][33][34][35]
Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard: Birdied the 72nd hole to beat Sean O'Hair by one stroke and claim his sixth Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard. Sank a 15-foot birdie putt on the final green, duplicating his last-putt heroics from two previous years (2001, 15-foot birdie putt to beat Phil Mickelson; 2008, 24-foot birdie putt to beat Bart Bryant). Matched his largest comeback after 54 holes (five strokes) with his victory. He also came back from five strokes behind after 54 holes to win the 2000 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am (Mark Brooks and Matt Gogel). Out of 66 career wins, it was his 19th coming from behind. Became the first player to win six Arnold Palmer Invitational titles. The only other players with multiple victories at the event are Tom Kite (1982 and 1989) and Loren Roberts (1994-95).

Woods wrote a golf instruction column for Golf Digest magazine from 1997 to February 2011.[203] In 2001 he wrote a best-selling golf instruction book, How I Play Golf, which had the largest print run of any golf book for its first edition, 1.5 million copies.[204] In March 2017, he published a memoir, The 1997 Masters: My Story, co-authored by Lorne Rubenstein, which focuses on his first Masters win.[205]
Surgery: Announced on Wednesday, June 18, two days after winning the U.S. Open, that he would have reconstructive surgery on the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee and miss the remainder of the 2008 season. Also announced that pain in his leg during the U.S. Open resulted from a double stress fracture to his left tibia, which he suffered while rehabilitating the knee. Surgery was performed on Tuesday, June 24 in Park City, Utah, by Dr. Thomas D. Rosenberg and Dr. Vernon J. Cooley, who did arthroscopic surgery on the same knee in April.
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World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play: In his first start at the World Golf Championships-Dell Technologies Match Play since 2013, and first start in the state of Texas since 2005, advanced to the Quarterfinals to finish T5 in the event. Playing at Austin Country Club for the first time in his career, earned two points to advance out of his group after defeating Aaron Wise and Patrick Cantlay. Suffered a 2-and-1 loss to Brandt Snedeker. Went head-to-head with Rory McIlroy for the first time with their match up in the Round of 16. Defeated McIlroy, 2 and 1, before falling to Denmark's Lucas Bjerregaard, 1-up.
Difficult season off the course, as he suffered the loss of father Earl after a long battle with cancer on May 3. Inside the ropes, World No. 1 dominated with eight victories, including two major titles (The Open Championship and PGA Championship). Entered the 2007 season with a TOUR streak of six consecutive victories. Led the TOUR in scoring average (68.11) but not eligible for seventh Vardon Trophy as he did not play 60 competitive rounds. Won Byron Nelson Award for low scoring average.
BMW Championship: Matched the low final round of his career with an 8-under 63 to win the BMW Championship by two strokes for 60th career TOUR victory. Took the lead for good with a 12-foot birdie on the 13th hole and kept his distance from third-round co-leaders Aaron Baddeley and Steve Stricker. Finished at 22-under 262, breaking by five shots the record he set four years prior at Cog Hill.
World Golf Championships-American Express Championship: With victory at the World Golf Championships-American Express Championship, became the first player in TOUR history to win five times in five consecutive seasons. Captured his record fifth consecutive Byron Nelson Award and the PGA of America's Vardon Trophy, based on each player's adjusted scoring average. Finished the season with an adjusted scoring average of 68.41, the second-lowest in TOUR history.
• Segments include Woods sharing how he preps for majors and how his off-week routines keep his game sharp and energy high. You’ll learn the four driver swings he has developed and his unique process for picking shots and clubs into the greens—get ready to be amazed! And then there’s winning at Augusta, the special lessons from his parents and how he now shares golf with his kids. All told with introspection and candor.
Woods turned pro at age 20 in August 1996 and immediately signed advertising deals with Nike, Inc. and Titleist that ranked as the most lucrative endorsement contracts in golf history at that time.[58][59] Woods was named Sports Illustrated's 1996 Sportsman of the Year and PGA Tour Rookie of the Year.[60] On April 13, 1997, he won his first major, the Masters, in record-breaking fashion and became the tournament's youngest winner at age 21.[61] Two months later, he set the record for the fastest ascent to No. 1 in the Official World Golf Rankings.[62] After a lackluster 1998, Woods finished the 1999 season with eight wins, including the PGA Championship, a feat not achieved since Johnny Miller did it in 1974.[63][64]
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A related effect was measured by University of California economist Jennifer Brown, who found that other golfers scored higher when competing against Woods than when he was not in the tournament. The scores of highly skilled golfers are nearly one stroke better when playing against Woods. This effect was larger when he was on winning streaks and disappeared during his well-publicized slump in 2003–04. Brown explains the results by noting that competitors of similar skill can hope to win by increasing their level of effort, but that, when facing a "superstar" competitor, extra exertion does not significantly raise one's level of winning while increasing risk of injury or exhaustion, leading to reduced effort.[163]
Earned his 80th PGA TOUR victory and first since 2013, winning the TOUR Championship for the third time in his career to move within two of Sam Snead's TOUR-best 82 victories. Finished the season No. 2 in the FedExCup, with runner-up finishes at the Valspar Championship and PGA Championship among his seven top-10s. Led the TOUR in Strokes Gained: Approach the Green (0.938) for the sixth consecutive season in which he played the minimum number of rounds. After originally being selected as a Captain's Assistant for the United States Ryder Cup team, was later selected as a captain's pick and played in the event for the eighth time.
I agree about the doubts on the channel. I see a lot of first putts rolling by the hole with some speed and then they cut to the next tee. Or a ball is sitting next to a hazard but a drop was never discussed. Sometimes I wonder if they take extra takes on putts or what not. Their good rounds are not unbelievable by any means and they can be shot. Some of the editing and what not is what raises doubts. 

Woods' back problems continued to hinder him in 2017. He missed the cut at the Farmers Insurance Open in January and pulled out of a European Tour event in Dubai on February 3. On March 31, Woods announced on his website that he would not be playing in the 2017 Masters Tournament despite being cleared to play by his doctors. Woods said that although he was happy with his rehabilitation, he did not feel "tournament ready."[115][116] Woods subsequently told friends, “I’m done”.[117] On April 20, Woods announced that he had undergone his fourth back surgery since 2014 to alleviate back and leg pain. Recovery time required up to six months, meaning that Woods would spend the rest of the year without playing any professional golf.[118] Woods returned to competitive golf at the Hero World Challenge in the Bahamas. He shot rounds of 69-68-75-68 and finished tied for 9th place. His world ranking went from 1,199th to 668th, which was the biggest jump in the world rankings in his career.

World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational: Benefactor of a big change in momentum on Firestone CC's famous 16th hole in winning for the 70th time in his career with the World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational victory. Trailing by one stroke, hit an 8-iron from 178 yards to within tap-in range for a birdie on the long par-5 16th. Meanwhile, Padraig Harrington, the third-round leader, hit from the collar of a bunker over the 16th green, but his delicate flop shot from behind the green came out hot, went into the water and he made a triple bogey-8 to give up the lead. Closed with consecutive 5-under 65s to reach 12-under and win by four strokes over Harrington and Robert Allenby. Became the first player in TOUR history to win the same event seven times on the same golf course. Also picked up 550 FedExCup points and extended his lead to 946 points. Joined Sam Snead (82) and Jack Nicklaus (73) as the only players to win 70 career TOUR events, but did so nearly seven years younger than Snead or Nicklaus.
Woods wrote a golf instruction column for Golf Digest magazine from 1997 to February 2011.[203] In 2001 he wrote a best-selling golf instruction book, How I Play Golf, which had the largest print run of any golf book for its first edition, 1.5 million copies.[204] In March 2017, he published a memoir, The 1997 Masters: My Story, co-authored by Lorne Rubenstein, which focuses on his first Masters win.[205]
Hero World Challenge: Hero World Challenge host finished T9 and 10 strokes behind champion Rickie Fowler. Marked his first appearance in competition since withdrawing from the Omega Dubai Desert Classic on February 2, 2017. Week included playing in the first and final round with reigning FedExCup champion and PGA TOUR Player of the Year Justin Thomas, with both players posting scores of 69-68 in those rounds.
I joined meandmygolf just under a month ago, after I saw the free videos on YouTube. I liked the way Piers & Andy explained the concepts, and sign... ed up for the free 30-days. I've played one year previously (2008), before I went to university, and had to drop this expensive hobby. I started playing golf again this summer, and was playing somewhere around 95-110 shots. I wanted to get better fast, and started the Break100-plan to get under 100 constently. I went through the plan a bit quicker, 2 weeks of the plan in one week, and just after I finished the last week, I pulled an amazing score of 84!!! That is absolutely insane. Something just clicked. If you want to build your game back up, or just go back to the basics, don't skip the drills. They may sound tedious and lame, but they actually help. Stick with the plan, and I guarantee it will work! Can't wait for the Break90 plan! Awesome job Piers & Andy! Read More
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