Progress! My handicap has come down from 11 (11.0) to 9 (9.2) in August 2017 across a run of three competition rounds out of four. Back in December 20... 16 I used the fault fixer to help improve ball-striking of my irons. MeAndMyGolf provided me with some videos to help with lag. And in August this started to feed through. MeAndMyGolf works for me better than one-on-one tuition with a teaching pro. I think this is because with the latter my swing is like a house of cards; all parts of the swing become up for grabs and I end up with no swing for at least a year. With MeAndMyGolf, I keep my swing private and only I know how to piece it all together; I can fix one thing at a time and integrate the change into my whole swing. So, on to the next fault to fix for 2018... Read More 

THE PLAYERS Championship: Kept streak alive of 12 career made cuts in as many attempts at THE PLAYERS, with eighth-place finish, snapping a string of six consecutive appearances at the event without a top-10 finish (dating back to his win in 2001). The six consecutive events without notching a top-10 finish represents his longest streak at any single event in his career.
AT&T National: Surpassed Nicklaus on all-time PGA TOUR victories list, with his 74th, at the AT&T National, his second win at Congressional CC. Trails only Sam Snead's 82 PGA TOUR victories. Overcame a one-stroke deficit of 54-hole leader Brendon de Jonge, posting a final-round 69 to edge runner-up Bo Van Pelt by two strokes. Two-time FedExCup champion moved to No. 1 in the FedExCup standings for the first time in 100 weeks with his third victory of the campaign, the 12th time in his TOUR career he has compiled at least three wins in a season.
Tiger Woods returned to Las Vegas this past weekend to host Tiger Jam at MGM Grand Hotel & Casino. Among the highlights of the weekend for participants in attendance at the 21st annual charity event, was a chance to experience Janet Jackson’s critically acclaimed Las Vegas Residency, “Metamorphosis.” The two-day charity event held Friday, May 24 and Saturday, May 25 brought a jam-packed weekend of activities to Las Vegas to raise funds for TGR Foundation.
Categories: Tiger Woods1975 birthsLiving peopleAmerican BuddhistsAfrican-American golfersAmerican male golfersAmerican people of Dutch descentAmerican people of Dutch-Indonesian descentAmerican philanthropistsAmerican sportspeople of Chinese descentAmerican sportspeople of Thai descentBBC Sports Personality World Sport Star of the Year winnersGolf writers and broadcastersGolfers from CaliforniaLaureus World Sports Awards winnersMen's Career Grand Slam champion golfersPeople from Cypress, CaliforniaPeople from Jupiter Island, FloridaPeople from Windermere, FloridaPeople named in the Panama PapersPGA Tour golfersPresidential Medal of Freedom recipientsRyder Cup competitors for the United StatesSportspeople from Anaheim, CaliforniaStanford Cardinal men's golfersWinners of men's major golf championships

Masters Tournament: On Tuesday, April 15, two days after finishing second at the Masters, underwent arthroscopic surgery on his left knee in Park City, Utah, to repair cartilage damage. Expected to miss 4-6 weeks. It was the same knee operated on in 1994 for a benign tumor, followed by arthroscopic surgery in 2002. Began experiencing pain in mid-2007 when he injured his anterior cruciate ligament while running at home in Orlando following The Open Championship but opted not to have surgery at that time.
After a slow start to 2014, Woods sustained an injury during the final round of the Honda Classic and was unable to finish the tournament. He withdrew after the 13th hole, citing back pain.[98] He subsequently competed in the WGC-Cadillac Championship but was visibly in pain during much of the last round. He was forced to skip the Arnold Palmer Invitational at the end of March 2014,[99] and after undergoing back surgery, he announced on April 1 that he would miss the Masters for the first time since 1994.[100] Woods returned at the Quicken Loans National in June, however he stated that his expectations for the week were low. He would struggle with nearly every aspect of his game and miss the cut. He next played at The Open Championship, contested at Hoylake, where Woods had won eight years prior. Woods fired a brilliant 69 in the first round to put himself in contention, but shot 77 on Friday and would eventually finish 69th. Despite his back pain, he played at the 2014 PGA Championship where he failed to make the cut. On August 25, 2014, Woods and his swing coach Sean Foley parted ways. In the four years under Foley, he won eight times but no majors. He had previously won eight majors with Harmon and six with Haney. Woods said there is currently no timetable to find a replacement swing coach.[101]
Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard: Birdied the 72nd hole to beat Sean O'Hair by one stroke and claim his sixth Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard. Sank a 15-foot birdie putt on the final green, duplicating his last-putt heroics from two previous years (2001, 15-foot birdie putt to beat Phil Mickelson; 2008, 24-foot birdie putt to beat Bart Bryant). Matched his largest comeback after 54 holes (five strokes) with his victory. He also came back from five strokes behind after 54 holes to win the 2000 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am (Mark Brooks and Matt Gogel). Out of 66 career wins, it was his 19th coming from behind. Became the first player to win six Arnold Palmer Invitational titles. The only other players with multiple victories at the event are Tom Kite (1982 and 1989) and Loren Roberts (1994-95).
Many courses in the PGA Tour rotation (including major championship sites like Augusta National) have added yardage to their tees in an effort to reduce the advantage of long hitters like Woods; this is a strategy that became known as "Tiger-Proofing". Woods said he welcomed the change, in that adding yardage to courses did not affect his ability to win.[164]
Woods has held numerous golf records. He has been the number one player in the world for the most consecutive weeks and for the greatest total number of weeks of any golfer in history. He has been awarded PGA Player of the Year a record 11 times[12] and has won the Byron Nelson Award for lowest adjusted scoring average a record eight times. Woods has the record of leading the money list in ten different seasons. He has won 15 professional major golf championships (trailing only Jack Nicklaus, who leads with 18) and 82 PGA Tour events (tied for first all time with Sam Snead).[13] Woods leads all active golfers in career major wins and career PGA Tour wins. He is the youngest player to achieve the career Grand Slam, and the second golfer (after Nicklaus) to have achieved a career Grand Slam three times. Woods has won 18 World Golf Championships. In May 2019, Woods was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the fourth golfer to receive the honor.[14]
Ryder Cup: Made his sixth Ryder Cup appearance, but first as a Captain's Pick, where he was victorious in three of the four matches in which he was involved. With 16 World Golf Championships titles and 28 top-10 finishes in 32 starts, returned to Sheshan International GC in Shanghai to try and add the HSBC Champions title, the only World Golf Championships title he has yet to capture, to his resume. Twice a runner-up in three previous starts, made five birdies on his inward nine in the final round to shoot a 4-under 68, good for T6 honors.
When Woods won the 2001 Masters, he became the only player to win four consecutive major professional golf titles, although not in the same calendar year. This achievement came to be known as the "Tiger Slam."[71] Following a stellar 2001 and 2002 in which he continued to dominate the tour, Woods' career hit a slump.[63][72] He did not win a major in 2003 or 2004. In September 2004, Vijay Singh overtook Woods in the Official World Golf Rankings, ending Woods' record streak of 264 weeks at No. 1.[73]
THE TOUR Championship presented by Coca-Cola: Entered the TOUR Championship No. 1 in the FedExCup standings and romped for his seventh victory of the season by eight over Mark Calcavecchia and Zach Johnson with rounds of 64-63-64-66–257 and captured the first FedExCup. Season earnings were a career-best $10,867,052. First player to win the TOUR Championship multiple times.
THE PLAYERS Championship: Kept streak alive of 12 career made cuts in as many attempts at THE PLAYERS, with eighth-place finish, snapping a string of six consecutive appearances at the event without a top-10 finish (dating back to his win in 2001). The six consecutive events without notching a top-10 finish represents his longest streak at any single event in his career.

Set or tied 27 TOUR records. Won three consecutive majors (U.S. and The Open Championships, PGA Championship) and career Grand Slam and totaled nine TOUR victories. Non-adjusted scoring average of 68.17 best in golf history, surpassing Byron Nelson's 68.33 unofficial mark of 1945. Finished the year with 47 consecutive rounds of par or better and completing all 20 events started under par. Won TOUR player of the year honors. Joined Ben Hogan (1953) as the only men to win three professional majors in one season. Was 53-under in four majors, next-best mark was 18-under by Ernie Els. Nine TOUR victories most in one season since Sam Snead won 11 in 1950. Season-opening victories at Mercedes Championship and AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am gave him wins in six consecutive starts, most since Hogan in 1948. Beat Els in a playoff at Mercedes, then came from seven strokes back with seven holes to play at Pebble Beach, keyed by an eagle-birdie-par-birdie finish, for a 64 and a two-stroke win. Finished T2 at Buick Invitational.
World Golf Championships-American Express Championship: With victory at the World Golf Championships-American Express Championship, became the first player in TOUR history to win five times in five consecutive seasons. Captured his record fifth consecutive Byron Nelson Award and the PGA of America's Vardon Trophy, based on each player's adjusted scoring average. Finished the season with an adjusted scoring average of 68.41, the second-lowest in TOUR history.
U.S. Open Championship: In his first start two months after surgery, parred the first sudden-death hole to beat Rocco Mediate and win the U.S. Open at Torrey Pines GC. Prevailed after he birdied the par-5 18th hole on Monday afternoon to complete an even-par 71 in an 18-hole playoff and tie Mediate to force sudden death, beginning on the par-4 seventh hole. Hit the green in regulation and two-putted on the dogleg right while Mediate, who was aiming to become the oldest U.S. Open champion at age 45, drove into a fairway bunker and then missed a 20-foot par putt. Sank a 12-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole to force the 18-hole playoff with Mediate at 1-under-par 283. The victory was his third in the U.S. Open, his 14th major championship and the 65th of his TOUR career, third alone behind Sam Snead (82) and Jack Nicklaus (73). Improved to 14-for-14 in majors when holding the third-round lead. The win was also his seventh at Torrey Pines in La Jolla, Calif. (six Buick Invitationals and one U.S. Open), the most in TOUR history on one course.
The Open Championship: Jumped to No. 2 in the Official World Golf Ranking, with a T3 finish at The Open Championship, his best performance in a major championship since finishing runner-up at the 2009 PGA Championship. Final-round 73 included a triple bogey on the par-4 sixth hole, his first triple in a major championship since the first hole at the 2003 Open Championship (Royal St. George's).
AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am: Searching for his first PGA TOUR win since the 2009 BMW Championship, carded a final-round 3-over 75 and was unable to match playing partner Phil Mickelson's stellar, 8-under 64 that led to victory at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. Paired with Phil Mickelson for the 30th time in a PGA TOUR-sanctioned event. The T15 finish came in his seventh start at the event and first since finishing T12 in 2002.
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